Getting Ready for Sunday September 6th at The Crossing

Prepare

Shay Roush wraps up our sermon series, “Life According to the Psalms” this week in a sermon entitled, “Life is Hard, but God is Good” from Psalm 73. The Scripture reads,

A psalm of Asaph.

1 Surely God is good to Israel,
to those who are pure in heart.

2 But as for me, my feet had almost slipped;
I had nearly lost my foothold.
3 For I envied the arrogant
when I saw the prosperity of the wicked.

4 They have no struggles;
their bodies are healthy and strong.
5 They are free from common human burdens;
they are not plagued by human ills.
6 Therefore pride is their necklace;
they clothe themselves with violence.
7 From their callous hearts comes iniquity;
their evil imaginations have no limits.
8 They scoff, and speak with malice;
with arrogance they threaten oppression.
9 Their mouths lay claim to heaven,
and their tongues take possession of the earth.
10 Therefore their people turn to them
and drink up waters in abundance.
11 They say, “How would God know?
Does the Most High know anything?”

12 This is what the wicked are like—
always free of care, they go on amassing wealth.

13 Surely in vain I have kept my heart pure
and have washed my hands in innocence.
14 All day long I have been afflicted,
and every morning brings new punishments.

15 If I had spoken out like that,
I would have betrayed your children.
16 When I tried to understand all this,
it troubled me deeply
17 till I entered the sanctuary of God;
then I understood their final destiny.

18 Surely you place them on slippery ground;
you cast them down to ruin.
19 How suddenly are they destroyed,
completely swept away by terrors!
20 They are like a dream when one awakes;
when you arise, Lord,
you will despise them as fantasies.

21 When my heart was grieved
and my spirit embittered,
22 I was senseless and ignorant;
I was a brute beast before you.

23 Yet I am always with you;
you hold me by my right hand.
24 You guide me with your counsel,
and afterward you will take me into glory.
25 Whom have I in heaven but you?
And earth has nothing I desire besides you.
26 My flesh and my heart may fail,
but God is the strength of my heart
and my portion forever.

27 Those who are far from you will perish;
you destroy all who are unfaithful to you.
28 But as for me, it is good to be near God.
I have made the Sovereign Lord my refuge;
I will tell of all your deeds.

We will take communion together this Sunday. God gives us communion to feed our faith, to help us trust in Christ’s death on our behalf. That means we have to reflect on why Christ died for us. We have to look again at ourselves and recognize our sin and ask God for forgiveness. A great way to get ready for communion, therefore, is to take some time this weekend to ask God to show you if there’s any sin in your life that you’re not seeing. Ask him for forgiveness. And if there are things you need to put right, in keeping with repentance, take the time this weekend to do it before Sunday morning (e.g., Matt 5:23–24).

We will sing a new song this week, “Christ is Coming, Let Creation.” As we often do, it’s an older hymn re-set to contemporary music. Have a listen and get a feel for it before Sunday, if you have a chance.

Here’s our song list for this Sunday (with links to lyrics and music)

Trees Will Clap (based on Isaiah 55) [lyrics and listen] – Andrew Camp, Scott Johnson, Patrick Miller and Greg Wiele

Almighty God [lyrics; listen] – Leslie Jordan, David Leonard, and Sandra McCracken

Christ is Coming, Let Creation [lyrics; listen] – words by John R. Macduff; music by Matt Scott

Enough [lyrics and listen] – Chris Tomlin and Louie Giglio

The Morning Star [lyrics and listen] – words by Isaac Watts; additional lyrics David A. Cover; music by Christine Cover, Greg Wiele, and Latifah Phillips

We Will Feast in the House of Zion [lyrics and listen] – Sandra McCracken

On Jordan’s Stormy Banks I Stand [lyrics; listen] – words by Samuel Stennett; music by Christopher Miner

See you on Sunday!

Leave a Reply